Is it happening at your school?

Healthy Eating

Is it happening at your school?

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If you and your school do most of the things in the table below, you are both doing a great job helping everyone make healthy food the main food.

What our school does: the whole-school approach

What I do to support my school

What I do to support me

Our school involves students in some decision-making about supporting healthy food choices at school.

I get involved in discussions about healthy eating and food choices at school.

I enjoy a wide variety of foods from the five food groups every day (see the Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013).

Our school encourages students to lead or participate in activities that support healthy food choices at school.

I get involved in activities that promote and support healthy eating at school.

I listen to my body to know when I'm hungry. I eat 'everyday' food when I'm hungry and stop when my hunger has been satisfied or I start to feel full.

Our school limits 'occasional' foods in the school canteen (choice and portion sizes).

I don't bring 'occasional' foods to school to share with my friends.

I only have 'occasional' food sometimes (not every day) and in small amounts. 'Occasional' foods include chips, biscuits, cake, pies, processed meat (like salami), lollies and fast food.

Our school provides opportunities for students to grow, prepare and/or eat different types of fruit and vegetables.

I get involved in growing and preparing different types of fruits and vegetables.

I try different types of fruits and vegetables often. I know my taste buds mature over time and it's important to keep trying new foods.

Our school involves students in creating 'student-friendly' eating areas.

I get involved in discussions about improving the areas we use for eating. I help keep the area clean and tidy, out of respect for other people at school.

I eat lunch every day at school.

Our school includes articles about healthy food in the school newsletter.

I don't tease others about their lunches or make negative comments. For example I don't say things like "What's that? It looks weird" while staring at someone else's lunch, or things like "That stinks! What is it?"

I talk to people at home about the different types of 'everyday' foods to try.

Our school promotes the benefits of breakfast to the whole school community.

I encourage my friends to eat breakfast.

I eat 'everyday' foods for breakfast.

Our school has a policy or guidelines that support healthy food as the main food at school.

I abide by school policies.

I don't diet or skip meals. I nourish my body.

Our school provides opportunities in class to critically analyse media messages about 'healthy' eating.

I get involved in discussions about the media and the information it presents about food.

I discourage my friends from dieting or skipping meals.

I think carefully about the messages I get from the media about 'healthy' eating. I use the Australian Dietary Guidelines and Healthy Food Plate as my guide.